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© 2018 Bisbee Fiber Arts Guild

New Class Offerings:
Amulet Bag Necklace
 
 

2018 Bisbee Fiber Arts Retreat & Gathering

June 21 - 23, 2019

Class Descriptions - Saturday, June 22nd, 2019

 

 

 

BLENDING NATURAL COLORS - Nancy Wilson                                 Materials Fee: $10

 

This class will introduce students to some basic blending techniques that can be used with natural colors using hand carders. Instructor will also demonstrate use of blending board and drum carder. We will use those techniques to see the effect of blending natural colors alone and with outrageously bright dyed fibers. Students are welcome to bring their own drum carder and/or blending board for use in class. Instructor will provide samples.

​Supplies/Equipment to bring to class:

  • wool hand carders

  • drum carder (optional)

  • blending board (optional)

Maximum students: 7

COTTON FIBER PREPARATION & SPINNING IN THE PUEBLO SOUTHWEST

Louie Garcia                                                                                            No Materials Fee

Cotton has a long history in the Pueblo Southwest and has been cultivated and used by the ancient Hohokam, Mogollon and Puebloan indigenous groups for at least 1500 years. The surviving Pueblos of Arizona and New Mexico are the last of these ancient people that continue to use this fiber since prehistoric times. A brief history of cotton in the Pueblo southwest will be discussed and we will explore ancient cotton fiber preparation and spinning.

 

Cotton fiber preparation and spinning in the Pueblos has always been a social activity as it required the help of many to produce the quantity of spun yarn to weave the large cotton mantas omnipresent in Pueblo ceremonies from birth to death. In Pueblo culture, spinning and weaving is a men’s activity. Join Louie in this workshop to learn more about the general significance of this versatile fiber and how it changed Pueblo culture forever.

 

Louie will have several textiles from his own collection to show the class various examples of cotton Pueblo textiles. This class will be limited to 12 participants and both men and women are welcome.

All required materials will be provided for use in this workshop free of charge. Participants will have the option to purchase spindles and Hopi short staple cotton if they so choose. Pueblo cotton spindles are $30 each and Mixtec cotton spindles from Oaxaca made from mangrove root with a clay whorl are $30 and $40 for small and large sizes. Hand processed Hopi short staple cotton lint will also be available in limited quantities for $20/2 oz. (gallon) bags. Cotton is organically grown and hand-ginned by Louie and his family from heirloom seeds.

Maximum students: 12

EMBELLISHED COILED BASKET - Darquis DeCoz                         Materials Fee: $25-35

In this class you will learn how to make a basket using a coiling technique. With a cotton cord as a core and wrapping it with yarn, waxed cotton/linen you will be surprised at what you can create. You will learn how to taper your ends to add more cording and how to end and start a new thread.

 

Since Darquis enjoys beading, she will teach you a simple beading technique to embellish the edge of your basket, then will demonstrate how to sew on the flowers, leaves, drops and pearls, to create a most beautiful piece of art. You will enjoy making and giving these little baskets to friends and loved ones.

Supplies/Equipment to bring to class:

  • scissors

  • small tray to work from to hold your beads

  • a creative mind!

Kits include:

  • cotton cording

  • yarn or wax cotton/linen

  • large round tip needle

  • two beading needles #10 (in case you break one)

  • beading thread

  • wax

  • mix colored seed bead in various size

  • glass bead flowers, leaves and drops

  • small and larger pearls

Maximum students: 12

JAPANESE BORO - Deb Brunner                                                        Materials Fee: $14

Experience the art of Japanese Boro patching and stitch work, once a utilitarian necessity, now considered an art form used for a multitude of items similar to the vintage Boro seen in museums and private collections. Create a one of a kind Boro piece using a variety of fabric and unique hand stitching as you learn about the history of this interesting technique. Examples of contemporary Boro will be shown allowing you to contemplate how this centuries old concept might fit into your fiber design life style.

Materials fee includes fabric, batting, thread and needles.

Supplies/Equipment to bring to class:

  • Fabric scissors

  • Thimble (optional)

Maximum students: 12

INDIGO DYEPOT – Ric Rao                                                                   Materials Fee: $15

We will be dyeing with two types of Indigo, Natural Pre-Reduced Indigo and Natural Indigo using Michel Garcias' 1-2-3 method. We’ll be dying mostly silk scarves and cotton as well as protein fibers. We can do some very simple shibori tying on the silk and cotton. Since we only have 3 hours, it would be better to not waste time on tying or stitching. Dyeing will be done outdoors next to the studio.

 

What students need to bring to class:

  • Rubber gloves,

  • Old clothes that you don’t mind getting dye on,

  • Closed shoes since we’ll be working with very hot liquids,

  • Drinking water since it will be hot in June.

 

Materials Fee will include the indigo and silk scarves and perhaps a cotton towel to dye.

Maximum students: 10

SPINNING ANGORA – Julie Drogsvold                                              Materials Fee: $15

Angora rabbits produce one of the softest and warmest fibers on Earth. This luxurious fiber available only from the Angora rabbit can be spun directly from the source or carded and blended. The yarn blooms into a gorgeous halo that is one of a kind. Explore this unique fiber from animal to garment in just one class.

 

Supplies/Equipment to bring to class:

  • Spinning wheel (no bulk spinners or WooLee winders. Prefer flyer driven wheels)

  • Lazy Kate and 3 clean bobbins

  • Lightweight top whorl spindle or supported spindle (optional)

  • Small hand towel

  • Bowl or cup for water (1 - 3 cup capacity)

  • Labeling tags & pencil

  • Niddy Noddy

Maximum students:​​ 12

SPINNING FLAX - Joan Ruane                                                                 Materials Fee: $5

 

Flax is a bast fiber. Bast fibers come from the stem of plants. We will learn what different preparations are available and how each is spun. A demonstration of dressing a distaff will be done during the class.

 

Supplies/equipment to bring to class:

  • Spinning wheel

  • Lazy kate

  • Niddy noddy

Maximum students: 12

Class Descriptions - Sunday, June 23rd 2019

Color Spinning – Jill Holbrook                                                                 Materials Fee: $15

We will learn to work with color. play with multiple ways of spinning and plying those lovely hand-painted roving and explore the art of colors.

Supplies/Equipment to bring to class:

  • Spinning wheel or spindle

  • Extra bobbins

  • Lazy Kate and Niddy Noddy if you have them

 

Maximum students: 12

INDIGO DYEING - Ric Rao                                                                       Material Fee: $15

We will be dyeing with two types of Indigo, Natural Pre-Reduced Indigo and Natural Indigo using Michel Garcias' 1-2-3 method. We’ll be dying mostly silk scarves and cotton as well as protein fibers. We can do some very simple shibori tying on the silk and cotton. Since we only have 3 hours, it would be better to not waste time on tying or stitching. Dyeing will be done outdoors next to the studio.

 

What students need to bring to class:

  • Rubber gloves,

  • Old clothes that you don’t mind getting dye on,

  • Closed shoes since we’ll be working with very hot liquids,

  • Drinking water since it will be hot in June.

 

 Ric will provide the indigo, silk scarves and perhaps a cotton towel to dye.

Maximum students: 10

JAPANESE BORO - Deb Brunner                                                            Materials Fee: $14

Experience the art of Japanese Boro patching and stitch work, once a utilitarian necessity, now considered an art form used for a multitude of items similar to the vintage Boro seen in museums and private collections. Create a one of a kind Boro piece using a variety of fabric and unique hand stitching as you learn about the history of this interesting technique. Examples of contemporary Boro will be shown allowing you to contemplate how this centuries old concept might fit into your fiber design life style.

Materials fee includes fabric, batting, thread and needles.

Supplies/Equipment to bring to class:

  • Fabric scissors

  • Thimble (optional)

Maximum students: 12

PIN LOOMS – Lindy Brigham                                                                    Materials Fee: $10

We will be learning the basics of pin loom weaving. There will be a brief overview of types of pin looms and examples of what can be made with the squares. We will weave at least two squares and then explore the many ways to join them. Students will leave with a binder of information and ideas

Supplies/equipment to bring to class:

  • If you have a pin loom and needle and yarn (or any combination thereof), bring them.

  • If you don’t have a loom, there will be enough for 6 people.

  • It only takes 8 yards of yarn for a square, so bring any interesting scrapes you have.

Maximum students: 6

SPINNING ALPACA FIBER – Nancy Wilson                                        Materials Fee: $10

This class will introduce students to spinning alpaca fiber. We will discuss the unique qualities of alpaca fiber that can make it difficult for a beginner to spin and address specific challenges students have experienced with the fiber.

 

Students will do some basic blending with wool as a method to ease into spinning alpaca fiber. We will discuss what types of fiber make for a good blend and why a spinner might choose to blend alpaca fiber.

 

Supplies/equipment to bring to class:

  • Spinning wheel or spindle

  • Wool carders

  • Extra bobbins

  • Lazy Kate

 

Maximum students: 7

SPINNING COTTON ON A CHARKA – Joan Ruane                           Materials Fee: $2

Dig out your charkha wheels from under the bed or in the dark closet. Let’s put them to work! Joan will bring several different types of charkha wheels and hopefully some of you will have some to bring. We will dust them off and learn how to spin cotton on them.

 

Supplies/Equipment to bring to class:

 

  • Your charkha wheels or just come and use one of Joan’s wheel

 

Maximum students: 10

 

WET FELTED DRYER BALLS - Lisa Thompson                                        Materials Fee: $5

This easy, fun class will teach you to create your own all-natural dryer balls. Dryer balls decrease drying time, saving you money on utility bills; they also increase fluffiness and
reduce static as dryer loads tumble. Commercial fabric softeners and dryer sheets are filled with harmful chemicals and perfumes that coat your clothing, eventually ending up on your skin. There are no chemicals in wool dryer balls!


Commercial dryer sheets can be costly and are thrown away after one use. Wool dryer balls can be re-used for years, saving you hundreds of dollars. Dryer balls help to soften

clothes naturally, and are made from a renewable resource.


There are several methods to make dryer balls, and for this class we’re going to do it the “hard way”, using alpaca roving, aluminum foil, hot water and elbow grease. During the class Lisa will discuss the “easy way” in case you want to make some more when you get home.


Materials Fee will include all the materials necessary for each student to make and take ONE natural colored dryer ball. If you want to embellish your ball with color, please bring some yarn or roving. Must be a natural fiber (hair) like wool or alpaca in order to felt properly. This is a wet-felt technique, so we will be having our hands in warm soapy water, and depending on how enthusiastic you are, it may splash on your clothes.

 

Class will take 30-45 minutes.

 

Maximum Students: 8 

 

 

PROGRAM SPEAKER

Louie Garcia

Cotton Fiber Preparation and Spinning in the Pueblo Southwest

Join us on Saturday evening for an insightful presentation by Louie Garcia, a Tiwa/Piro Pueblo fiber artist and educator from New Mexico.  Louie's work can be found in various museums and private collections throughout the Southwest and has been a featured artist at several Native American art shows including the Indigenous Fine Arts Market in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  In 2015, he hand spun 3000 yards of home grown single-ply cotton yarn to make a replica of the Arizona Openwork (Tonto) Shirt, a prehistoric Southwestern textile that was worked in the sprang technique by collaborating fiber artist Carol James, which was then donated to the Arizona State Museum in Tucson, Arizona where the original shirt resides.  Louie works diligently to research, document and revitalize traditional Pueblo fiber arts among the Pueblo communities of Arizona and New Mexico.  As a bilingual educator, he is able to reach large audiences, both in the states and in Mexico, and works passionately to inspire fellow fiber enthusiasts and all who appreciate indigenous cultures and traditional knowledge.

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

Lindy Brigham

Lindy began weaving on a 4 harness floor loom in 1973 to keep from going bonkers in graduate school. In the intervening years she's discovered the almost infinite possibilities for what a loom might be. Two years ago she re-discovered pin loom weaving and loves seeing the resurgence in techniques over the years. Like crocheting granny squares, one can weave almost anywhere and put together the pieces in ever more creative ways. She looks forward to exploring the possibilities with you all.

 
Deborah Brunner
 

Deborah Brunner has been a lifelong fiber enthusiast, from the age of seven sewing and knitting for Barbie then herself and friends.  The love of fabric and the desire to create her own finally brought her to weaving 28 years ago.  Of course one thing leads to another, spinning soon followed which proves ‘you can never say never!’  There is always something new or something old to pique her interest and continued exploration of the fiber arts.

 

Debbi is the author of two books of clothing design and embellishment; Crazy Rags; Contemporary Wearable Art and Flora Botanica.  She taught a variety of fiber art workshops nationally beginning in 1994 then started her company Deborah Brunner Fiber Arts in 1996 providing hand dyed fabrics, yarns and spinning fiber was a passion until 2014 when she decided to pursue her personal goals and continue to teach, sharing techniques she finds interesting. 

Darquise DeCoz

Darquise has been a fiber artist for 15 plus years. Although sewing and knitting were a big part of her teenage years, she still enjoys all fabric and is an avid knitter. Beading became a passion for her, creating wonderful pieces and teaching all kinds of beading techniques. After taking a weaving class she was hooked, then came tapestry, dry and wet felting and working with leather.

 

Now Darquise has taken 2 years of college classes in silver smithing and enjoys working at the bench creating one of a kind pieces with copper, silver and semi-precious stones. Always busy and always creating…her motto is LIVE IN THE NOW.

Julie Drogsvold

Julie Diane splits her time between raising French Angora rabbits for fiber and the show table, and spinning angora and her favorite cellulose fibers. Recently she has become infatuated with hemp, its uses and everything that it is capable of doing. Such a wonderful resource. She lives in southeast Arizona after being raised in the Midwest, and loves every moment of desert living. She shares her life with her family of Siamese cats, bird and cattle dogs, rabbits of every description and humans, short and tall.

Jill Holbrook

Jill loves spinning, knitting and weaving when possible. Her love of these arts has created a passion to learn and perfect her techniques. Jill is known for her fine and beautiful yarns as well as her knowledgeable style of teaching.

Ric Rao

Ric has been  involved in fiber arts for more than 40 years.   Handspinning in 1975, then experimenting with  natural dyes and weaving. In 2000 he started a dye garden in Las Cruces, New Mexico and has been giving natural dye workshops throughout  the southwest for 14+ years. Ric is also a certified Yarn and Fleece Judge and has judged yarns and fleeces at many local shows and fairs throughout the Southwest. He's been the superintendent of the fleece show in Taos, New Mexico since 2015 and assisted at the NY Sheep and Wool Festival at Rhinebeck in 2014. Ric is currently  working on the Master Spinner Program from Olds College and put together a handbook for teaching  Handspun Yarn and Fleece Judging for the Southwest  Spinners Handspun Judging committee; he's also published an article on dyeing cotton for Ply Magazine, Spring 2016 issue.

Joan Ruane

First a professional teacher and then a spinner, Joan Ruane has been teaching spinning classes throughout the U.S., Canada, UK , Australia and New Zealand since 1980. Active in local and regional Guilds, she has also owned and operated fiber shops in both Florida and Arizona.

 

Joan has published cotton newsletters, written articles for fiber magazines and has published two DVD: Cotton "Spinning Made Easy" and "Cotton Spinning With A Takli". She has republished "Hand Spinning Cotton" by Harry and Olive Linder, bringing it up to date with modern techniques. In 2015 Joan published the much needed “Beginning Cotton Spinning on the Wheel” workbook. Her DVD’s can be streamed through Taperootvideo.com.

 

Lisa Thompson

Lisa Thompson is owner of Thunder Mountain Alpaca Ranch in Hereford, AZ. She has been living in Cochise county for 18 years, raising alpacas for 9, and a member of the Bisbee Fiber Arts Guild for 7 years. Lisa is STILL learning to spin, loves to weave and do any fiber arts that doesn’t require following a pattern. She attends the local Farmer’s Markets, hosts ranch tours at Thunder Mountain, hosts on AirBNB and Harvest Hosts, and in her free time is Single Mom to a beautiful teenage daughter.

Nancy Wilson

Nancy Wilson began spinning shortly after she and her husband Chris acquired their first llamas in 1988, followed by an alpaca in 1993. In 1988 she had an “aha” moment: “These llamas have fiber on them; I need to learn to spin it.” With an educational background in textiles and clothing, spinning seemed a logical next step. Nancy completed her Master Spinner Certification through Olds College in Canada, and her In Depth Study covered blending double-coated llama fiber. She enjoys sharing her passion for fiber with others through programs and workshops.